MSA DALMATIAN COAST POST-TOUR JUNE 3-7, 2012

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ITINERARY

DAY 1 - JUNE 3 PULA TO SPLIT
DAY 2 - JUNE 4 SPLIT TO DUBROVNIK
DAY 3 - DUBROVNIK AND VISIT TO KOTOR, MONTENEGRO
DAY 4 - DUBROVNIK TO ZADAR.
DAY 5 - VISIT ZADAR AND RETURN TO PULA

 

DAY 1 SPLIT
Split is famous for the spectacular palace built by Emperor Diocletian in the late 3rd Century AD. This enormous structure was the retirement home for Diocletian from 305 until his death in 313. However, to understand the development of Split as a city one must look 3 miles north to ancient Salona the believed birthplace of Diocletian.

Once the most prosperous city in the mid Adriatic, Salona had many inhabitants starting with the Illyrians, followed by the Greeks and Romans. It was under the Romans that Salona truly thrived. It became the capital of the Roman Province of Dalmatia and the richest and most populated city in the region.

Reconstruction of the Palace of the Roman Emperor Diocletian in its original appearance upon completion in AD 305

Prosperous times ended for Salona when it was sacked by the Avars and Croats in 614 and its inhabitants driven to nearby Split.

Until 614 Split had been little more than a small community built around the great palace of Diocletian. After Diocletian’s death the palace was used as an administrative center and residence of the provincial governor. But following the destruction of Salona thousands of refugees migrated to Split and settled there. Split eventually became part of the Venetian Empire in 1409.

In addition to the great palace of Diocletian there are many other important sites to visit.

Cathedral of Saint Domnius; the bell tower is the city's main symbol.

 

Among them the Cathedral of St. Domnius, the medieval square, the Church of St. Francis and the Croatian Archeological Museum.

View of the peristyle towards the entrance of Diocletian's quarters

 

DAY 2 DUBROVNIK
DEPART SPLIT FOR DUBROVNIK
Overnight Dubrovnik.

The two nights we are staying in Dubrovnik we will be at the Four Star Grand Hotel Park:

Dubrovnik at night:


The prosperity of Dubrovnik has always been based on maritime trade. In the Middle Ages it was known as the Republic of Ragusa and became the only Adriatic city-state to rival Venice. The city achieved a remarkable level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries. The modern name of the city is derived from, the Slavic word “dubrava” (forest in English). In Croatian, the city is known as Dubrovnik and in Latin, Dalmatian and Italian, Ragusa.

 

Until the outbreak of the Croatian War in 1991, Dubrovnik (renowned for the beauty of its historic monuments and magnificent walls) was a major international tourist destination. Founded in the 7th Century it was at times under the rule of Byzantium, Venice and Hungary. In 1382 it became the Republic of Ragusa and by the 15th Century was a major maritime power with a fleet of over 500 ships.

The decline of the Republic followed a number of disasters, most importantly the catastrophic earthquake of 1667, which killed a large portion of the population and destroyed much of the city.

 

In 1815 it became part of the Hapsburg Empire and in 1918 part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia when the name was officially changed from Ragusa to Dubrovnik.

Tito gained control of the city in 1944 making it part of communist Yugoslavia.

DAY 3
DAY TRIP TO KOTOR MONTENEGRO, OVERNIGHT IN DUBROVNIK

The old Mediterranean port of Kotor is surrounded by impressive city wall built by the Republic of Venice and Venetian influence remains predominant in the city's architecture. In recent years, Kotor has seen a steady increase in tourism, attracted by the natural beauty of the Gulf of Kotor and the old town of Kotor itself.
Kotor, first mentioned in 168 BC, was settled during Roman times, and was known as Acruvium. It was part of the Roman province of Dalmatia.

 


Kotor was fortified in the early Middle Ages, when Emperor Justinian built a fortress above Acruvium in 535, after expelling the Ostrogoths.

The city was plundered by the Saracens in 840. In the 14th century, commerce in Cattaro (as the city was called until 1918) competed with that of the nearby Republic of Ragusa and of the Republic of Venice. The city was part of the Venetian Republic from 1420 to 1797, except for periods of Ottoman rule in 1538–1571 and 1657-1699. Four centuries of Venetian domination have given the city the typical Venetian architecture, that contributed to make Kotor a UNESCO world heritage site.

In 1941 Mussolini occupied Montenegro and annexed it to Italy until 1944 when the Yugoslav Partisans liberated it. It remained a part of Yugoslavia until 2006 when it became an independent Republic.

 

 

 

DAY 4. MORNING IN DUBROVNIK, AFTERNOON PROCEED TO ZADAR.

Zadar has been populated since prehistoric times, earliest evidence of human life comes from the Stone Age, and numerous settlements are dated from the Neolithic Age. Before the Illyrians, the area was inhabited by the Liburnians. Zadar was a Liburnian settlement, founded in the 9th century BC. In the 2nd century BC, the Romans began invading the region and by 33 BC had established the province of Illyricum.

Under Roman rule, Zadar developed into one of the most flourishing centers on the eastern Adriatic coast. While not a major center of Roman administration, archaeological finds indicate a significant economic and cultural center. By some estimates, in the 4th century it had around ten thousand citizens. In 441 and 447 Dalmatia was ravaged by the Huns and in 481 became part of the Ostrogothic kingdom. About the same time (6th century) Zadar was hit by an earthquake, which destroyed most of the Roman city. In 536, the Byzantine Emperor Justinian started to reconquer the territories of the former Western Empire and in 553 Zadar fell to the Byzantine Empire.

 

Zadar's economy revolved around sea, fishing and sea trade in the first centuries of the Middle Ages. Forced to turn their attention seaward, the inhabitants of Zadar focused on shipping, and the city became a naval power to rival Venice.

DAY 5 MORNING IN ZADAR, AFTERNOON PROCEED TO PULA.

The Arena is the only remaining Roman amphitheater to have four side towers and with all three Roman architectural orders entirely preserved. It is the sixth largest surviving Roman arena and a rare example, among the 200 Roman surviving amphitheatres, of unique technological solutions. It could accommodate 23,000 spectators. It is also the best preserved ancient monument in Croatia.

Arch of the Sergii, 1st century

Temple of Roma and Augustus

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